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The Top 5 Ways to Beat Carpal Tunnel

  • Dr. Steve Young
  • 17 Apr, 2023

Unlock the Power of Pain-Free Hands with These Carpal Tunnel Tips

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common condition that affects people who perform repetitive motions with their hands, such as typing, writing, or using hand-held tools. The condition results from the compression of the median nerve, which runs through the wrist and can cause pain, numbness, and tingling in the hand and fingers. In this article, we’ll explore four common causes of carpal tunnel syndrome and five ways to help manage the condition through ergonomic changes.

Four Causes of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

There are several factors that can contribute to the development of carpal tunnel syndrome, including:

Repetitive motions: Repetitive motions such as typing, writing, or using hand-held tools can put repeated stress on the median nerve and lead to the development of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Anatomical factors: Certain anatomical factors, such as wrist size, shape, or arthritis, can increase the likelihood of developing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Medical conditions: Medical conditions such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and thyroid problems can increase the risk of developing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Pregnancy: Pregnancy can cause fluid buildup in the wrist and increase the pressure on the median nerve, leading to the development of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Five Ways to Help Manage Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Ergonomics

Ergonomic changes can be an effective way to manage Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and reduce the risk of developing the condition. These changes include:

Adjusting Your Workstation: Adjusting the height of your keyboard, mouse, and monitor to reduce the strain on your wrist can help manage Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Taking Breaks: Taking frequent breaks from repetitive motions and stretching your arms and hands can help reduce the strain on the median nerve and prevent the development of carpal tunnel syndrome.

Using Ergonomic Tools: Using ergonomic tools such as wrist braces, mouse pads, and keyboards can help reduce the strain on the median nerve and prevent the development of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Strengthening Exercises: Strengthening exercises for the wrist and hand can help improve flexibility and reduce the risk of developing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Good Posture: Keeping good posture, especially when doing things over and over again, can help reduce stress on the median nerve and stop carpal tunnel syndrome from happening.

What Not to Do with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

It is important to avoid certain activities and behaviors that can worsen carpal tunnel syndrome, including:

Ignoring the Symptoms: Ignoring the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome can lead to the development of more severe symptoms and increase the risk of permanent nerve damage.

Overusing the Wrist: Overusing the wrist, especially in repetitive motions, can increase the risk of developing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Using Your Wrist as a Crutch: Using your wrist as a crutch, such as holding a phone or tablet with one hand, can put unnecessary stress on the median nerve and worsen Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

If you don't follow ergonomic advice, like using ergonomic tools and taking breaks often, you may be more likely to get carpal tunnel syndrome.

By understanding the four common causes of the condition and making ergonomic changes, such as adjusting your workstation, taking breaks, and using ergonomic tools, you can help manage Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and prevent the development of more severe symptoms. Also, it's important to avoid doing things that can make carpal tunnel syndrome worse, like ignoring the symptoms, overusing the wrist, and not following ergonomic advice.

References:

  • Gelberman, Richard H., et al. "Carpal tunnel syndrome." The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, vol. 84, no. 2, 2002, pp. 174-183.
  • Kujala, Urho M. "Epidemiology of work-related upper limb disorders." Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, vol. 27, 2001, pp. 85-98.
  • Rempel, David, et al. "Wrist posture and carpal tunnel pressure." Clinical Biomechanics, vol. 15, 2000, pp. 28-33.

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